What Would It Be Like to Have a Large Parrot?
Dutch man holding red macaw on the arm outdoors

What Would It Be Like to Have a Large Parrot?

Last Updated on by Mitch Rezman

(Author Unknown)
Try this:
1.WASTEFUL.. Buy $30 worth of groceries and throw $24 worth in the trash as soon as you arrive home. Do this several times a month. Parrots require fresh food in addition to pellets (not seeds) and are wasteful eaters. If you can’t afford the wastefulness of a parrot, you can’t afford the parrot. 

2.BITES.. Slam your fingers in your car door to simulate a bite. If you have a parrot, you will be bitten, sometimes just hard, sometimes really hard, and some times with blood and severe damage. Parrots can be very temperamental and some favor a love/hate relationship that seems more like a game of “GUESS WHAT MOOD I’M IN TODAY”. Large male Cockatoos are famous for being hormonal teenagers. When these males are in the presence of a human female that is experiencing her monthly cycle – WATCH OUT! Remember, if your parrot bites someone, there may be a financial obligation that goes with that bite. Do you have homeowner’s/renter’s insurance? Does it cover animal bites? If not, how will you cover any lawsuit that may arise from a parrot bite?
 
3.ATTACHED.. Velcro a 1 pound weight to your arm and keep it there for 2 hours at a time, 3 or 4 hours a day, every day for a week. This is how it feels to have your “baby” with you, which you will want because they are our babies. In the case of Cockatoos, they crave the physical contact of their flock – YOU are their flock. If you don’t have the time or the desire to have this much interaction with a parrot, reconsider your decision to bring a parrot into your home.
 
4.MESS.. Scatter cooked and dry oatmeal on your floor. Let the cooked oatmeal dry good and hard. Clean up the mess and repeat. Do this a min of 3X a day for a week. This is similar to a parrot’s mess (food and poop). Its really more than 3x a day, but I can’t keep up with the sweeping and mopping more than 3x a day. Cage papers must be replace several times a week. The cage, toys, perches, playgyms, T-Stands, etc, must be cleaned at least once a week and sometimes more depending upon the bird. Birds are clean by nature. They spend several hours a day, every day preening/cleaning themselves. Don’t be selfish and ignore the mess. If you can’t or won’t spend the time necessary to keep the parrot’s home clean, then a parrot isn’t right for you at this time.
 
5.NOISE.. Record from the library the TOO screaming and play it on your stereo full blast for 15 mins 3x a day. Some parrots are not as loud, some may be louder, some may scream short periods, while others scream longer periods, but all parrots scream, squawk, sing, or talk. They do it when they’re happy, scared, mad, on alert, or just for no reason at other than to do it. If you live in an apartment or condo, your neighbors may become your enemy. Do loud noises bother you? Are you a nervous person? If the noise would be a reason to find your parrot a new home, DON’T bring the parrot into your home!
 
6.FEEDING.. Every morning before work and every evening as soon as you get home, fix a bowl of fresh fruit/veggies and water in clean bowls. Don’t forget to remove the food bowl after 2 hours so it doesn’t cause harm to your would be parrot. How often do you eat out? How healthy do you currently eat? You will have to buy groceries and cook for your parrot! Junk food won’t cut it. If you do not have the time to shop and cook for yourself before the parrot, what makes you think you will do it when you bring birdie home? Be realistic, if you don’t have the time to shop and cook, you don’t have the time for a parrot!
7.BOARDING/OTHER.. Planning a vacation? Travel a lot with business? Enjoy frequent weekend getaways? Need to paint? What about if you are ill, have an accident, or die? Where will birdie stay? Find someone to care/board your parrot before you get a parrot. Local bird shops maybe a place, but do you really trust them? Parents, friends, siblings, neighbors are a good choice, but find out if they are truly willing beforehand. The day will come when you must board your parrot for one reason or another. Make certain you are prepared for that day.
 
8.MEDICAL CARE.. Routine vet check-ups are a must, but what about medical emergencies? Is there an avian vet in your area? Not all vets see birds and not all vets that see birds are qualified avian vets. Locate the nearest avian specialist before you need them and get prices on routine care vs. emergency care. Wings and nail can be clipped by yourself, vet, or qualified pet shop. Be careful, blood feathers and nails will bleed if a mistake is made. Do you have the money to spend for the initial vet exam, the yearly exams, and medical emergencies? If not, then please consider your over financial situation. Parrots are expensive from the very beginning. If you get a great deal on a “used” parrot, there may be health problem and $1500 (or more) later, you may have a healthy parrot. If you don’t have an emergency stash, get one ASAP. If you cant afford to divert any funds to an emergency stash, you can’t afford a parrot!
 
9.TOYS, TOYS, TOYS Are you handy with a saw and drill? If not, then you will be spending a lot of money on chew toys, $30+/- a week! Parrots chew. If you don’t provide chew toys, they will find their own (sheet rock, furniture, wood trim, themselves, etc). Parrots don’t care what value an item has to you, all they care about is chewing, so provide plenty of chew toys at all times, as well as stimulating toys. Play with your parrot, remember they are intelligent and enjoy a variety of activities. Toys are a MUST to achieve a happy, healthy parrot. Add the cost to your budget, if your budget can’t absorb the cost, don’t get the parrot!
 
10.VISITORS.. Do you have frequent visitors in your home? Not everyone understands bird people and their birds and some people just shouldn’t be allowed around our birds. Be prepared to see a decline in visitors, rude guests, and guests who will try to teach birdie to say not so nice things, feed them junk food, smoke around them or try to touch them after smoking, etc. Your bird’s well-being must come first and foremost.
11.COOKWARE ALERT!.. Teflon kills! All nonstick surfaces have Teflon type coatings that produce a gas that kills birds – FAST! Opt for stainless, alum, copper, glass, or enamel. TEFLON coatings can be found in many household appliances – ovens, toasters, irons, waffle irons, coffeemakers, hairdryers, etc. If you think just this one time won’t hurt, YOU ARE WRONG! If you can’t part with the nonstick stuff, then at some point you will be parting with your parrot from death of the fumes.
12.TOXINS .. certain plants, smoke, aerosols, fragrances, candles with wicks that contain a metal stem, carpet fresheners, air fresheners, FaBreeze, some essential oils, certain hair products, certain foods (avocados, caffeine, alcohol, chocolate). As new products are added to the market, new dangers are made aware to us. You must continue to educate yourself on these hazards. Be prepared to parrot proof you home. If you can’t forgo the use of these items and are unwilling to keep your parrot out of harm’s way, why spend the money/time for a parrot at all?
 
13.TIME..Your parrot need your undivided attention for a considerable amount of time. Each species and each bird is different. A Cockatiel may only want 20 mins 3x a day (I can tell this by when he starts getting nippy), but a Cockatoo is happy only when they can be your right arm pal for hours at a time. There is bath time that needs to take place in the morning to give the parrot time to dry before nightfall. This can be a trying feat if birdie doesn’t favor bathtime, but it is a necessity. Every morning you must fix breakfast, change papers, and spend some quailty/quantity time. Does your morning schedule allow for this? Are your evenings filled with school activities, work from the office, college courses, etc? PLEASE reconsider the notion to bring a parrot into your home if you can’t spend quality and quantity time with your parrot!
 
14.DISCIPLINE..Discipline is not punishment. It is establishing boundaries, respect, schedules, education, and acceptable behaviors for both you and your parrot. In order to effectively discipline yourself and your parrot, you must first learn what is considered normal behavior and what is considered destructive behavior. This means you are going to have to READ, READ, and READ some more. Do you have the dedication it takes to effectively discipline yourself and your parrot? If not, don’t set yourself up for failure and jeopardize the well-being of another parrot by unknowingly encouraging behavior that will only pave the way for the parrot to place with another home.
 
15.EDUCATION ..Educate yourself on the type of bird you think you want to adopt /buy/rescue. Does this parrot fit the description of what you want? You must educate yourself on what the characteristics of a healthy bird and the cause and effect of illness. natural habitat, nesting, breeding, etc. Join a bird club, visit message boards, be involved with other parrot owners. More importantly is to continue to educate yourself. By educating yourself, your are paving the way for a very fulfilling relationship with your parrot. If you do not have the desire to learn as much as you can about your parrot, why would you want a parrot? Because they are cool? Please don’t be that shallow. Parrot ownership is a very serious commitment. You are responsible for the health and well-being of an intelligent, emotional, living creature. Don’t take it lightly or it will bite you (literally and figuratively).
 
16.CHILDREN/PETS.. Parrots may consider children and other pets as rivals. Be cautious of this fact. If you have or are planning on having children, you are in for a rocky ride. Be forewarned!
 
17.JEWELRY/CLOTHING ..A large parrot can and will remove gemstones from their settings! Earrings/Other piercings will be removed with or without a piece of flesh. Parrots seem to love metal and enjoy beaking chains into pieces. Clothing will have a new look that is personalized by your parrot. Little holes around the arms and neck is normal. Anything that is 3-D is considered fair game (rhinestones, studs, etc). Eyeglasses are no exception! If this behavior is unacceptable, then a parrot in your home is unacceptable!
 
18.POOP.. It happens and it will be on your floors (better put something over the carpet), on their cage/playgym, on your furniture, and yes – on you. More importantly is daily observation of what the poop looks like. You can tell if they are sick, if they are eating to many watery fruits, if they aren’t eating enough of something, etc. The poop must be cleaned off daily or the build up will be more disgusting than daily clean-ups. Birds are messy, not dirty. Don’t force them to live in substandard conditions because you are to busy or to lazy to tend to the mess.
 
19.MONEY..Even if the parrot was not expensive, there is the purchase of a quality cage that meets or exceeds space requirements, toys, food, treats, playgym, T-stand, carrier, initial vet check, perches (must have different texture/size to stimulate healthy feet), and the dreaded, fearful, emergency care costs. Don’t forget the cost to repair any damage your parrot may cause to you or other’s person or property. Owning a parrot and affording a parrot are two different things. If you can’t afford ALL the costs that go along with the parrot, don’t get the parrot!
 
20.ENTERTAINMENT/LOVE/JOY/HAPPINESS..A happy parrot makes a happy human. What a parrot provides in return for putting up with them is greater than you can ever imagine. Life with a parrot is never the same as the day before. We are willing owned by our birds and our life revolves around our birds. It is a commitment we gladly make for the rest of our lives. If you can’t make a lifelong commitment to a parrot, get a pet with a shorter life span.
 
If after reading this you still want a parrot, I welcome you and ask that you commit yourself to being the best friend you can be to your companion Good luck and remember that right now may not be the best time for you to become an owner, you be the judge. Please remember to always keep the parrot’s best interest at heart.
Thank you.

Who are the individuals participating in the conversation?

In the conversation, there are multiple individuals who are expressing their thoughts and experiences regarding different bird species. Some of the participants include Xoetix, April, Tyrion, sunnysmom, Fickle, and others. They all have their unique perspectives and preferences when it comes to birds.

Xoetix appreciates budgies and considers them to be excellent recruiters for a cult. They acknowledge the charm and attractiveness of budgies.

April finds joy in the cleanliness of budgies, particularly admiring their tiny and easy-to-clean droppings. She also compares the cleanup process of budgies to that of other parrot species, mentioning that budgies are easier to handle in terms of waste management.

Tyrion has a slightly different viewpoint, suggesting that the ease of taking care of a bird depends on the individual and their personal connection with the bird. They express their love for their own Grey and Amazons, considering them easy to handle. Tyrion believes that the bond with the bird determines the ease of caring for them.

sunnys mom shares their opinion that cockatiels are the easiest bird species overall. They note that while individual birds may differ, cockatiels as a whole are considered easy to handle. They caution against thinking that mastering a smaller bird automatically means one should move on to a larger bird, and emphasize that each bird should be appreciated for its unique qualities.

Fickle comments on their initial impression of Rosy Bourkes, highlighting their surprise at discovering how sweet, calm, and amazing these birds are. They mention that while finches and canaries are the easiest birds to care for on a more hands-off basis, understanding the behavior and needs of Bourkes requires a calm owner with bird behavior knowledge.

Throughout the conversation, these individuals primarily discuss their experiences with budgies, cockatiels, and other bird species, sharing their opinions on ease of care, personality traits, and the importance of finding a bird species that resonates with one’s own preferences.

Are budgies easy birds to take care of?

“Budgies are known to be relatively easy birds to take care of. They are small in size, which makes them more manageable compared to larger parrot species. With proper attention and care, budgies can thrive and make wonderful pets.

One aspect that contributes to the ease of budgie care is their diet. They have a simple diet consisting of bird seeds, fresh fruits, and vegetables. Keeping their water clean and readily available is also important. Regular feeding and providing a balanced diet ensure their nutritional needs are met.

In terms of housing, budgies do not require large cages, but it’s essential to provide them with adequate space for exercise and movement. Multiple perches and toys should be available to keep them mentally stimulated. Regular cleaning of the cage and maintaining optimal temperature and lighting conditions are vital for their well-being.

Socialization is crucial for budgies as they are highly sociable birds. They enjoy interaction and thrive in the company of their human caretaker or a companion budgie. Spending quality time together, talking to them, and engaging in gentle play helps create a strong bond with these affectionate birds.

Budgies are generally hardy and resilient, but they still require regular veterinary check-ups to ensure their health and well-being. Monitoring their overall condition, including their feathers, beak, and eyes, is important to detect any signs of illness or discomfort early on.

Providing mental stimulation is also key to keeping budgies happy. They are intelligent creatures that benefit from mental enrichment activities such as puzzle toys, foraging opportunities, and training exercises. These activities not only occupy their minds but also prevent boredom.

Overall, while every bird requires a certain amount of care and attention, budgies are considered one of the easier bird species to look after. With proper nutrition, a comfortable environment, regular social interaction, and adequate mental stimulation, budgies can thrive and bring joy to their owners’ lives.”

What are some factors to consider when adopting a bird?

When considering adopting a bird, there are several important factors to take into account. Firstly, it’s crucial to understand that all parrots have the potential to bite. Their inclination to bite may vary, and individual experiences can differ greatly. Generally, older rehomed birds who have settled into their new environment may be the easiest to care for as they are content with a simple routine of eating and playing.

Another factor to consider is the potential harm caused by cockatiel dust, specifically for new world species like conures and macaws. It’s essential to keep these species separate from cockatiels to prevent any adverse effects.

It’s worth noting that no matter the species, any bird has the capability to bite. The severity of the bite will depend on the size of the bird’s beak. While a lovebird may not cause significant damage, their bite can still be painful.

Aside from these considerations, it is important to research and understand the specific needs and temperament of the bird species you are interested in adopting. Factors such as diet, socialization requirements, and exercise needs should be taken into account to ensure you can provide a suitable and fulfilling environment for the bird.

Overall, adopting a bird requires careful consideration of these factors, as well as a commitment to providing a safe and nurturing home for your new avian companion.

Does anyone have any experience or thoughts on other parrot species from cockatiel owners?

Certainly! When Fickle started the thread, they were interested in hearing from cockatiel owners who have experience or thoughts on other parrot species. Mizzely acknowledged that all parrots have the potential to bite intentionally and mentioned that there would be numerous answers given the diverse nature of parrots. They highlighted that in their personal experience, older parrots who have been rehomed tend to be the easiest to care for as they are content with a simple life of eating and playing.

Sunnysmom contributed to the discussion by stating their opinion that cockatiels, in general, are the easiest bird species to care for. However, they made it clear that individual birds’ personalities can vary, meaning that even within the same species, some birds may be easier or more challenging to handle.

Overall, the responses indicated that while cockatiels may be perceived as easy birds to care for, different parrot species can vary in terms of temperament and care requirements. It is essential to consider the specific needs and characteristics of each individual bird, regardless of their species, for a successful and fulfilling ownership experience.

Is there a parrot species that is fun, loving, and comical but won’t potentially bite with intent or rip a finger off?

When it comes to parrots, finding one that is fun, loving, and comical while not potentially biting with intent or causing harm requires careful consideration. While there may not be a specific parrot species that guarantees absolutely no biting or aggression, there are some factors you can keep in mind.

Firstly, older rehomed parrots tend to be more laid-back and content with a simple life of eating and playing. These birds have already gone through their developmental stages and may be more settled in their behavior, reducing the likelihood of aggressive tendencies.

Secondly, each parrot has its own unique personality, which can greatly influence their behavior. Some parrots naturally have a more docile nature and are less prone to biting. However, it’s important to remember that behavior can still vary significantly even within the same species.

Additionally, providing proper training, socialization, and environmental enrichment for your parrot can play a crucial role in minimizing the chances of aggressive behavior. This includes spending quality time with your bird, interacting with them positively, and ensuring they have plenty of mental and physical stimulation, such as toys and foraging activities.

It’s also important to note that parrots have different beak sizes, strength, and capabilities. While any parrot, regardless of species, can potentially inflict a bite with intent, larger parrots like macaws and cockatoos may have a greater ability to cause serious harm compared to smaller parrots like cockatiels or lovebirds.

Lastly, some parrot species produce a fine dust from their feathers that could potentially be harmful to other parrots, particularly those from New World species like conures and macaws. If you are considering having multiple parrots from different species, it’s vital to research and take necessary precautions to prevent any potential health risks.

In conclusion, while it is challenging to find a parrot species that guarantees no potential for biting or aggression, factors such as the individual parrot’s age, personality, and proper care can influence their behavior. It’s crucial to approach parrot ownership with patience, understanding, and a commitment to providing a nurturing and stimulating environment for your feathered friend.

What is the next step up in parrots after budgies, rosy bourke parrots, and cockatiels?

When it comes to parrots, finding one that is fun, loving, and comical while not potentially biting with intent or causing harm requires careful consideration. While there may not be a specific parrot species that guarantees absolutely no biting or aggression, there are some factors you can keep in mind.

Firstly, older rehomed parrots tend to be more laid-back and content with a simple life of eating and playing. These birds have already gone through their developmental stages and may be more settled in their behavior, reducing the likelihood of aggressive tendencies.

Secondly, each parrot has its own unique personality, which can greatly influence their behavior. Some parrots naturally have a more docile nature and are less prone to biting. However, it’s important to remember that behavior can still vary significantly even within the same species.

Additionally, providing proper training, socialization, and environmental enrichment for your parrot can play a crucial role in minimizing the chances of aggressive behavior. This includes spending quality time with your bird, interacting with them positively, and ensuring they have plenty of mental and physical stimulation, such as toys and foraging activities.

It’s also important to note that parrots have different beak sizes, strength, and capabilities. While any parrot, regardless of species, can potentially inflict a bite with intent, larger parrots like macaws and cockatoos may have a greater ability to cause serious harm compared to smaller parrots like cockatiels or lovebirds.

Lastly, some parrot species produce a fine dust from their feathers that could potentially be harmful to other parrots, particularly those from New World species like conures and macaws. If you are considering having multiple parrots from different species, it’s vital to research and take necessary precautions to prevent any potential health risks.

In conclusion, while it is challenging to find a parrot species that guarantees no potential for biting or aggression, factors such as the individual parrot’s age, personality, and proper care can influence their behavior. It’s crucial to approach parrot ownership with patience, understanding, and a commitment to providing a nurturing and stimulating environment for your feathered friend.

When it comes to parrots, finding one that is fun, loving, and comical while not potentially biting with intent or causing harm requires careful consideration. While there may not be a specific parrot species that guarantees absolutely no biting or aggression, there are some factors you can keep in mind.

Firstly, older rehomed parrots tend to be more laid-back and content with a simple life of eating and playing. These birds have already gone through their developmental stages and may be more settled in their behavior, reducing the likelihood of aggressive tendencies.

Secondly, each parrot has its own unique personality, which can greatly influence their behavior. Some parrots naturally have a more docile nature and are less prone to biting. However, it’s important to remember that behavior can still vary significantly even within the same species.

Additionally, providing proper training, socialization, and environmental enrichment for your parrot can play a crucial role in minimizing the chances of aggressive behavior. This includes spending quality time with your bird, interacting with them positively, and ensuring they have plenty of mental and physical stimulation, such as toys and foraging activities.

It’s also important to note that parrots have different beak sizes, strength, and capabilities. While any parrot, regardless of species, can potentially inflict a bite with intent, larger parrots like macaws and cockatoos may have a greater ability to cause serious harm compared to smaller parrots like cockatiels or lovebirds.

Lastly, some parrot species produce a fine dust from their feathers that could potentially be harmful to other parrots, particularly those from New World species like conures and macaws. If you are considering having multiple parrots from different species, it’s vital to research and take necessary precautions to prevent any potential health risks.

In conclusion, while it is challenging to find a parrot species that guarantees no potential for biting or aggression, factors such as the individual parrot’s age, personality, and proper care can influence their behavior. It’s crucial to approach parrot ownership with patience, understanding, and a commitment to providing a nurturing and stimulating environment for your feathered friend.

What is the opinion on the ease of owning different bird species?

There is a difference in opinions when it comes to the ease of owning various bird species. Personally, I believe that cockatiels are one of the easiest birds to take care of. However, it is important to remember that individual birds may have their own unique personalities and needs.

Sometimes, people think that once they have mastered taking care of a smaller bird, they should move on to a larger one. However, I think it is important to appreciate and cherish each bird for who they are. For me, I initially got a cockatoo because it was my partner’s preference, but I was perfectly content with having cockatiels as my only birds. That being said, I do love my cockatoo dearly. He brings joy and amusement to my life every day. However, I must admit that he is not an easy bird to handle.

When it comes to suggesting a particular bird species, it really depends on what catches your interest and why. It is crucial to remember that any bird has the potential to bite, although the severity may vary based on the size of their beak. I once had a lovebird who, despite being small, managed to give me a slight injury with a bite. So, if you are not comfortable handling a large bird, it is best to avoid them. Personally, I prefer smaller birds as they are more manageable for me.

Discovering new bird species can be exciting. For example, I recently came across Rosy Bourkes and was amazed by how sweet, calm, and gentle they are. They could easily be contenders for the title of the easiest bird to care for. However, it’s important to note that even seemingly easy birds like finches and canaries require some level of bird behavior knowledge and care, albeit less hands-on.

In summary, the ease of owning different bird species really depends on the individual bird and your own comfort level. It is essential to do proper research and seek guidance to understand the specific needs and behaviors of any bird species you may be considering as a pet.

Who are the individuals participating in the conversation?

In the conversation, there are multiple individuals who are expressing their thoughts and experiences regarding different bird species. Some of the participants include Xoetix, April, Tyrion, sunnysmom, Fickle, and others. They all have their unique perspectives and preferences when it comes to birds.

Xoetix appreciates budgies and considers them to be excellent recruiters for a cult. They acknowledge the charm and attractiveness of budgies.

April finds joy in the cleanliness of budgies, particularly admiring their tiny and easy-to-clean droppings. She also compares the cleanup process of budgies to that of other parrot species, mentioning that budgies are easier to handle in terms of waste management.

Tyrion has a slightly different viewpoint, suggesting that the ease of taking care of a bird depends on the individual and their personal connection with the bird. They express their love for their own Grey and Amazons, considering them easy to handle. Tyrion believes that the bond with the bird determines the ease of caring for them.

sunnysmom shares their opinion that cockatiels are the easiest bird species overall. They note that while individual birds may differ, cockatiels as a whole are considered easy to handle. They caution against thinking that mastering a smaller bird automatically means one should move on to a larger bird, and emphasize that each bird should be appreciated for its unique qualities.

Fickle comments on their initial impression of Rosy Bourkes, highlighting their surprise at discovering how sweet, calm, and amazing these birds are. They mention that while finches and canaries are the easiest birds to care for on a more hands-off basis, understanding the behavior and needs of Bourkes requires a calm owner with bird behavior knowledge.

Throughout the conversation, these individuals primarily discuss their experiences with budgies, cockatiels, and other bird species, sharing their opinions on ease of care, personality traits, and the importance of finding a bird species that resonates with one’s own preferences.

Are budgies easy birds to take care of?

“Budgies are known to be relatively easy birds to take care of. They are small in size, which makes them more manageable compared to larger parrot species. With proper attention and care, budgies can thrive and make wonderful pets.

One aspect that contributes to the ease of budgie care is their diet. They have a simple diet consisting of bird seeds, fresh fruits, and vegetables. Keeping their water clean and readily available is also important. Regular feeding and providing a balanced diet ensure their nutritional needs are met.

In terms of housing, budgies do not require large cages, but it’s essential to provide them with adequate space for exercise and movement. Multiple perches and toys should be available to keep them mentally stimulated. Regular cleaning of the cage and maintaining optimal temperature and lighting conditions are vital for their well-being.

Socialization is crucial for budgies as they are highly sociable birds. They enjoy interaction and thrive in the company of their human caretaker or a companion budgie. Spending quality time together, talking to them, and engaging in gentle play helps create a strong bond with these affectionate birds.

Budgies are generally hardy and resilient, but they still require regular veterinary check-ups to ensure their health and well-being. Monitoring their overall condition, including their feathers, beak, and eyes, is important to detect any signs of illness or discomfort early on.

Providing mental stimulation is also key to keeping budgies happy. They are intelligent creatures that benefit from mental enrichment activities such as puzzle toys, foraging opportunities, and training exercises. These activities not only occupy their minds but also prevent boredom.

Overall, while every bird requires a certain amount of care and attention, budgies are considered one of the easier bird species to look after. With proper nutrition, a comfortable environment, regular social interaction, and adequate mental stimulation, budgies can thrive and bring joy to their owners’ lives.”

What are some factors to consider when adopting a bird?

When considering adopting a bird, there are several important factors to take into account. Firstly, it’s crucial to understand that all parrots have the potential to bite. Their inclination to bite may vary, and individual experiences can differ greatly. Generally, older rehomed birds who have settled into their new environment may be the easiest to care for as they are content with a simple routine of eating and playing.

Another factor to consider is the potential harm caused by cockatiel dust, specifically for new world species like conures and macaws. It’s essential to keep these species separate from cockatiels to prevent any adverse effects.

It’s worth noting that no matter the species, any bird has the capability to bite. The severity of the bite will depend on the size of the bird’s beak. While a lovebird may not cause significant damage, their bite can still be painful.

Aside from these considerations, it is important to research and understand the specific needs and temperament of the bird species you are interested in adopting. Factors such as diet, socialization requirements, and exercise needs should be taken into account to ensure you can provide a suitable and fulfilling environment for the bird.

Overall, adopting a bird requires careful consideration of these factors, as well as a commitment to providing a safe and nurturing home for your new avian companion.

Does anyone have any experience or thoughts on other parrot species from cockatiel owners?

Certainly! When Fickle started the thread, they were interested in hearing from cockatiel owners who have experience or thoughts on other parrot species. Mizzely acknowledged that all parrots have the potential to bite intentionally and mentioned that there would be numerous answers given the diverse nature of parrots. They highlighted that in their personal experience, older parrots who have been rehomed tend to be the easiest to care for as they are content with a simple life of eating and playing.

Sunnysmom contributed to the discussion by stating their opinion that cockatiels, in general, are the easiest bird species to care for. However, they made it clear that individual birds’ personalities can vary, meaning that even within the same species, some birds may be easier or more challenging to handle.

Overall, the responses indicated that while cockatiels may be perceived as easy birds to care for, different parrot species can vary in terms of temperament and care requirements. It is essential to consider the specific needs and characteristics of each individual bird, regardless of their species, for a successful and fulfilling ownership experience.

Is there a parrot species that is fun, loving, and comical but won’t potentially bite with intent or rip a finger off?

When it comes to parrots, finding one that is fun, loving, and comical while not potentially biting with intent or causing harm requires careful consideration. While there may not be a specific parrot species that guarantees absolutely no biting or aggression, there are some factors you can keep in mind.

Firstly, older rehomed parrots tend to be more laid-back and content with a simple life of eating and playing. These birds have already gone through their developmental stages and may be more settled in their behavior, reducing the likelihood of aggressive tendencies.

Secondly, each parrot has its own unique personality, which can greatly influence their behavior. Some parrots naturally have a more docile nature and are less prone to biting. However, it’s important to remember that behavior can still vary significantly even within the same species.

Additionally, providing proper training, socialization, and environmental enrichment for your parrot can play a crucial role in minimizing the chances of aggressive behavior. This includes spending quality time with your bird, interacting with them positively, and ensuring they have plenty of mental and physical stimulation, such as toys and foraging activities.

It’s also important to note that parrots have different beak sizes, strength, and capabilities. While any parrot, regardless of species, can potentially inflict a bite with intent, larger parrots like macaws and cockatoos may have a greater ability to cause serious harm compared to smaller parrots like cockatiels or lovebirds.

Lastly, some parrot species produce a fine dust from their feathers that could potentially be harmful to other parrots, particularly those from New World species like conures and macaws. If you are considering having multiple parrots from different species, it’s vital to research and take necessary precautions to prevent any potential health risks.

In conclusion, while it is challenging to find a parrot species that guarantees no potential for biting or aggression, factors such as the individual parrot’s age, personality, and proper care can influence their behavior. It’s crucial to approach parrot ownership with patience, understanding, and a commitment to providing a nurturing and stimulating environment for your feathered friend.

What is the next step up in parrots after budgies, rosy bourke parrots, and cockatiels?

When it comes to moving up from budgies, rosy bourke parrots, and cockatiels, the parrot kingdom offers a variety of options. Choosing the next step up depends on your preferences and level of commitment. While there are many possible answers to this question, I’ll provide some insights to help you make an informed decision.

One potential step up in parrots from the aforementioned species could be conures. These playful and often colorful birds make great companions and are known for their energetic personalities. Conures come in different species, such as the Green Cheek Conure, Sun Conure, and Nanday Conure, each with its own unique traits. They are generally more active and require more mental stimulation than smaller parrots like cockatiels. Conures can be a wonderful choice if you are looking for a highly interactive bird that can keep you entertained with their antics.

Another option to consider is the lovebird. These small parrots are known for their strong bond with their owners and their playful nature. Lovebirds come in various species, including the Peach-faced, Fischer’s, and Masked lovebird. They are intelligent birds that can be easily trained and can delight you with their inquisitive and affectionate behavior. Lovebirds thrive on social interaction and, with proper care and attention, can become a loyal and entertaining addition to your household.

If you are seeking a parrot with a larger size and an impressive set of vocal abilities, you might be interested in exploring the world of African Grey Parrots. These highly intelligent birds are often regarded as one of the best talking parrot species. African Greys have the cognitive abilities to understand and mimic human speech, making them exceptional companions. However, they require extensive mental and social stimulation to thrive, so be prepared to provide them with plenty of enrichment activities and interaction.

Ultimately, the next step up in parrots after budgies, rosy bourke parrots, and cockatiels relies on your personal preferences and dedication. Proper research and consideration of the specific needs, personalities, and care requirements of different parrot species will enable you to find the perfect match for you and your lifestyle.

Mitch Rezman

This Post Has One Comment

  1. Name*: Marie D
    Email*:
    Item # : Response to article
    What kind of bird(s)? : I had an Eclectus who passed 2 weeks after surgery.
    Message*: Good Morning Catherine and Mitch, I just read your article on What would it be like to own a large parrot. Hands down an excellent and true fact read for anyone to acknowledge the true commitment and time consumption for the health and well being of a large fid. It’s a labor of love but the love we receive from our winged babies makes it all worthwhile. This should be a real eye opener for anyone who is thinking about ownership. Love your articles, ! Marie
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