The Bird Cage Privacy Canopy

Spaulding courtesy of Michelle Karras & the Polite Parrot
 
We talk about the 60/40 rule a lot. In the wild birds spend 60% of their time looking for food and 40% of their time trying not to be food. Because they are birds the most threatening predators are other (predatory) birds like hawks, eagles and raptors in general.
  
Much like if we were to bring a prehistoric person into the 21st century there are certain concepts your bird may not grasp quickly. One concept your bird doesn’t understand is “glass”. Putting your bird by a large picture window is fine but you have to be aware that if there are Hawks or other birds of prey in your area that can be seen from the window by your bird it can be deathly frightening because they don’t understand they are protected by the glass.

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Help for a Yellow Head Parrot
Yellow headed parrot perched on a tree branch

Help for a Yellow Head Parrot

Good Day! I have a beautiful Yellow Head Parrot that has been with me since birth. we grew up together! My mom bought him,(Chico) When I was born, and according to my mother, he had just been born. I am now 56 years young, LOL!! 
 
He is very healthy and happy.
He is my little companion and I have just decided to remodel his cage and give him some more love, do something different.

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Will Your Bird have the Same View for 50 Years?

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In the video below its stated quite succinctly.

In the wild, parrots spend 50 to 70% of their daylight hours foraging for food.

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Shut Up I’m on the Phone

I’m on the phone chatting with the customer and I hear the familiar noise of squawk in the background. No sooner does the bird quiet down, do I hear the woman who I was speaking to on the phone, cover the mouthpiece, and YELL “hey you hold it down” clearly referring to the noisy bird in the background. This is a sign of a new bird owner so I asked her “have you had the bird long”? “About a month” came the expected reply.
 
“I don’t know if you realize that yelling at your bird to be quiet only encourages your bird to be noisier? The problem is birds are flock animals and when you start “yelling” at your bird, your bird is thinking “hey this is great I finally have somebody to talk to” (more…)

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Changes in the Product Lines of Foraging Toys

We were recently interviewed for a pet magazine article with some interesting questions. We thought you’d enjoy our answers

1. Have you seen any noticeable changes in the product lines of bird foraging toys/ foraging treats in the past five years or so? Are more companies expanding into the foraging marketplace (bird companies that didn’t previously offer them)?

Yes, we have seen a larger offering of Foraging Toys on the market due to bird researchers and bird owners learning that parrots need more mental stimulation in order to prevent boredom, plucking, and self-mutilation due to long hours of being left to their own devices.

The days of a simple bell on a chain and a set of Olympic Rings are long gone.

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Is It Normal for an Indian Ringneck to Feed a Lovebird?

Do you know of anyone who makes cages for disabled birds? I’m looking for something probably made of plexiglass for a Congo. He/she is about 7 weeks old. Has a bad right leg. He is standing on his left & seems like he will perch. 

I’m going to be moving him into a plastic bucket that I can make perches for. If he learns to perch, I’ll be looking for a cage. It was an option to have the leg removed.

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How Does Winter Stress Your Bird?

Most birds that we find in our homes come from the equatorial regions of Earth. There’s a large difference in temperature between the Midwestern United States and South American rain forest. Aside from maintaining your bird’s optimal physical health during the winter, climate changes are counterintuitive to your bird and can be stressful.
 
Having a humidistat near your bird’s cage gives you an idea of the relative humidity your birds experiencing. Winter (depending upon your geography) and the resultant heating process in your home guarantee a dry environment. This can be offset by keeping a humidifier near the cage (unless you have a whole house humidifier), and making sure your bird gets a bath of some sort. It can be a spray mist or a romp in the sink or shower. For smaller birds keeping a birdbath in the cage with just enough water, they could get their chest wet is really all that’s necessary.

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Mark Hagen on Avian Nutrition Research

Optimum nutrition can be achieved with many different diets. However it is not easy and understanding some basic principles of the pro and cons of each food item as it relates to vitamins, minerals, proteins, fat is important when trying to make up a mixture of foods.

Wild animals and birds are shown by their parents the right combination of sometimes very limited types of foods to meet their requirements for flight, growth, reproduction and living! These wild food items have been selected through thousands of years of evolution. In captivity, they are under different conditions and eating different foods and we expect them to select the best combination immediately.

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