How to Stop Parrots from Screaming
How to Stop Parrots from Screaming

How to Stop Parrots from Screaming

Boy if we had THE answer we’d be writing this from our yacht. But of course I have to weigh in here. What got me thinking about the subject of “why birds scream,” is some recent web surfing.

I spend my days doing what many of you wish you could be doing, surfing the web for bird toys and parrot cages. The magic of the internet enables us to shop the world. In order for us to provide the best possible shopping experience.

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4 Bird Keeping Clean Ideas
parrot-rumba

4 Bird Keeping Clean Ideas

We’re going to get started by talking about one of our favorite product lines Lixit. Do you really need a water bottle? Birds being the messy creatures that they are will poop in their water dishes regardless of placement.

 This means the stray food, the poop, and other contaminants which carry bacteria get ingested by your bird. One of the easiest ways to overcome these problems is to install a Lixit water bottle in your birdcage.

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Parrotlet Care and Feeding Info
Pacific Parrotlet, Forpus coelestis on green grass forpus is a species of small parrot

Parrotlet Care and Feeding Info

Parrotlets – although appearing to be about the size of a parakeet, is not how they see themselves. They definitely have a big bird mentality and an abundance of energy. Because they had not been in captivity for all that long nobody really knows their average lifespan which is generally expected to be around 15 to 20 years, some say even 30. With proper care, these little birds can be quite durable pets.

In spite of their size these little birds possess all the intelligence and the attitude of the biggest of Macaws. Unlike the big Macaws, Parrotlets are easily suited for apartment dwellers as they cannot scream and are actually one of the quieter parrots you can have.

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Hormones Are Important in Dictating Your Birds Behavior
Hormones Are Important in Dictating Your Birds Behavior

Hormones Are Important in Dictating Your Birds Behavior

It’s spring, which means some of you may have noticed your bird’s behavior has begun to change a bit which may mean, your bird’s hormonal cycle has begun to change. You can expect many changes but above all expect the unexpected.
 
One of the harshest realities to deal with is the aggression that you might not have seen before which is normal and probably won’t last a long time. Unlike other pets like cats and dogs, you really can’t discipline your bird for this. Hormonal behavior will happen when a parrot hits sexual maturity causing hormones to modify his or her behavior.
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Wing Clipping Video and Bird Nail Trimming Challenges
Wing Clipping Video and Bird Nail Trimming Challenges

Wing Clipping Video and Bird Nail Trimming Challenges

Hi

While doing some housekeeping on WindyCityParrot.com, we came across some broken links in the Hagen bird food listings. The H.A.R.I. (Hagen Avicultural Research Institute) site had been reorganized causing several links to break, which are now fixed

Mark Hagen talks about avian nutrition

Research Papers

Nutrition Expert Panel Review

Information Sheets from the Vet

TROPICAN AND THE COMPETITION – WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE

H.A.R.I. “TIPS FROM THE VET”

It was interesting reviewing the links and a new video that had been added – the Hagen How to Groom Flight Feathers below. One of the tips mentioned – birds should learn to fly and land before the first wing clipping. Another was not to trim a young bird’s nails AND wings at the same time because it may reduce their confidence. What I really like about the video is the close ups of precisely where to cut the feathers on the bird’s wings.

Should you keep your bird flighted? I think it’s an argument that will last for a while. Greg Glendell is a strong advocate for keeping birds flighted. He lays out his case and starts with “So, ALL birds are subject to risks in the home, whether they are flighted or not: clipped birds are just subjected to *different* risks than those of flighted birds. Generally, wing-clipping is done for owner-convenience, rather than bird ‘welfare’ Read the rest of Keeping birds flighted here.

Our take on the issue? Keep your bird flighted but give them flying lessons with an Aviator Harness.

You can also give them flying lessons at home. Teach them boundaries in and around your home. Have your bird step up onto your hand, walk a few paces from his bird cage and “launch” him so he makes a couple of wing flaps and learns where to land on the cage. When we did this with Sunshine, our Indian Ringneck. The first couple of landings were rough, he tried to land on the side of the cage meaning he basically used his chest to cushion the landing. 

On the third try I held my hand higher. He gauged it right and made to to the Play top perch. A couple of more launches and he knew to always land on runway “2 niner”. Within a week he could flap his way back to the play top perch from any place in the apartment..

Does this make it right for your bird? Not necessarily. You may be in a small house or apartment with lots of (confusing) windows. You may have other animals you don’t want riled up. If that’s the case, clip the wings. It’s not as hard as you think.

Bird’s nails are another issue. When they’re too long , they can be quite annoying. You can’t get release from your clothing. Bird’s nail can be painful on your skin too. A grooming perch belongs in every bird cage. Just don’t let your bird sleep on it, it could hurt his feet

We prefer to place a grooming perch, inside the bird cage door. The thinking goes like this:

 

When it’s time for your bird to come out of the bird cage, you open the cage door. Your bird comes down to he grooming perch and does a happy dance, on the grooming perch. Manicure time!

If a grooming perch isn’t keeping your bird’s nails short, they’ll require trimming. You can use a bird nail trimming clipper. The problem with clippers is you’re always guessing wher the quick is. When you cut close too the quick, your bird bleeds – solution?

Trim them with a rotary bird nail trimmer. We feel it’s far more humane for the bird and we embedded a “how-to” video so you’ll get comfortable with the process. The hardest part is restraining your bird. This is typically done with a towel. “Toweling” a bird is a good procedure to know – it can come in handy in an emergency too. In any case it’s a good procedure to practice, if you have a parrot. Find instructions on how to towel a bird, here 

Until next timeCatherine Tobsing
President
Windy City Parrot, Inc.

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Feeding Wild Birds in Winter
Feeding Wild Birds in Winter

Feeding Wild Birds in Winter

BIRD NOTES:
WINTER BIRD FEEDING
 
If you feed birds, you’re in good company. Birding as a hobby currently stands second only to gardening as America’s favorite pastime. A 1997 report from the Kaytee Avian Foundation estimates that 43 percent of U.S. households or about 65 million people provide food for wild birds. And, as a nation, we spend at least 2.5 billion dollars annually on bird-related products, including birdseed and bird feeders.
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Wild Bird Feeding Questions
Wild Bird Feeding Questions

Wild Bird Feeding Questions

You recently started feeding the birds. Do not be surprised if you do not see birds immediately. It may take several weeks before birds will find a new feeder setup. Be sure to provide the appropriate set-up when starting. Include several different feeder options in your set-up and a variety of seeds to attract different types of birds. Also make sure that your yard provides a bird friendly habitat. If you have few trees or shrubs in the area of your feeder, they may not be attracted to it. Trees and shrubbery provide protective cover to birds in case of predators. 
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