How Windy City Parrot Looks At Our Bird’s Holistically

Pet food manufacturers as well as Internet “influencers” somehow associate the word “holistic” with “healthy” which indicates (to me) they clearly never read the definition of “holistic“.

 

ho·lis·tic – adjective

 

PHILOSOPHY – characterized by comprehension of the parts of something as intimately interconnected and explicable only by reference to the whole.

 

Thus from this point forward, you will go forth and snigger the next time someone tries to sell you holistic anything.

 

When you interact with us,

 

whether it be here, on our website, social media, email, or any other form of communication, we try to introduce you to holistic bird health as a way of succeeding with captive bird care – meaning: 

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How And Some Of The Why’s African Greys Molt Differently Than Other Parrots
An African Grey Parrot sitting on top of his cage preening his wing feathers.

How And Some Of The Why’s African Greys Molt Differently Than Other Parrots

Your African grey may have upwards of 8000 feathers. Feathers keep a bird warm, and dry and enable flight.

For a molt to occur, the old feather must be removed. Before molting begins blood vessels that support the feathers dry up so the attached feather becomes loosened by the surrounding tissue.

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Avian Respiration Diseases

Anatomy and function

The upper respiratory system (URS) consists of the external nares, operculum, nasal concha, infraorbital sinus, and choanal slit.

 

The nares are paired symmetrical openings with an operculum within each. The nares each communicate with the nasal cavity containing the concha.

 

The left and right nasal cavities are separated by a septum. The nasal cavity communicates with the left and right infraorbital sinus.

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Change Is Essential for Your Bird to Accept It

Editor’s note: you will read these words later in the post:

Hi Catherine.  Peaches has always been in my small bird room with the cockatiels, lovebirds, Meyers, Quakers, conures, and a very skittish white-capped Pionus I adopted last year.  It’s been a long road to get her to accept me.  Peaches doesn’t like to be near (within 2  feet) other birds.

Otherwise she tolerates them so I am sure she is loving all the attention Mitch is giving her.  She was out of her cage (24 X 22) morning and afternoon for a total of two hours.  She also enjoyed being on the jungle gym in the kitchen area.  I have never used a water bottle with her. She doesn’t throw food in her water.  Since I am home all day.  Water dishes get changed twice a day if needed.

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Birds Are Like Soul Mates & Should Find You – Right?

[email protected]……..

Mitch, I learned sooooo much from you in today’s message about bird safety. I’m seeing my household with completely new eyes now. Thank you so much.

We are first-time bird companions of two one-yr-old beautiful little male budgies acquired at the same time from the same breeder when they were still youngsters. They are healthy and active.

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The Challenge of Caring for a One-eyed African Grey

Aloha!

I am truly enjoying your email newsletters. Very informative.

Need some of your advice, I have a Timneh African Gray named “Saber”, now I think about 30 years old. I ended up buying him when he was about 3-4 years old. For several months I would visit the pet shop and always stopped by Sabers cage to play and talk with him.

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How Did Our Cockatiel’s Leg & Foot End Up in a Paper Cast?

 Funny you should ask – file under life imitating art imitating life.

On the heels (<- pun) of last week’s blog entitled “How do birds sleep standing on one leg?” where we saw the most exceptional illustrations of how the flexor tendons in a birds leg act as an ingenious pulley system enabling a bird to firmly grasp a perch even while sleeping and in the case of birds of prey this system also aids in the killing of said prey.

Mother nature as usual was simple eloquent and right to the point. The question arose recently, for us, how do you shut down 50% of that system for maintenance? It’s been an interesting few days.

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Correction of Developmental Abnormalities of the Beak of Juvenile Psittacines

INTRODUCTION
Rhamphorthotics, or correction of developmental abnormalities of the beak of juvenile psittacines has been well described by Clipsham and others. 1 2,3 Techniques are described for correction of “Scissors beak” or lateral deviation of the premaxilla or maxillary beak and for bradygnathism of the maxillary beak.
A simplified and more practical technique will be described here utilizing many of the same materials. A more invasive technique has also been described utilizing a pin placed through the frontal bone and rubber bands to pull the beak into alignment. 4

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The Pet Bird Keepers Myths – Myth
Cheerful couple of customers buying cage for bird in shop

The Pet Bird Keepers Myths – Myth

Imagine a world where you spend every day looking at, reading about, or having conversations with other pet bird keepers. File this under “be careful what you wish for.” That said I will tell anyone upfront, I’m not an expert on caged bird keeping. I don’t have a degree – in anything. I haven’t written a book – yet.

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Help – My Catalina Macaw Is Chewing Everything!

I have ordered toys from you previously. To be quite honest, I have probably ordered at least one toy from every place I’ve found online. 

I have a 5 yr old Catalina Macaw that I have had since he was 6-1/2 weeks old. At 6 months old, he broke the bars of his first cage, then we got him a big “Kings Corner” Cage, and it didn’t take him long to learn how to open the latch on the door, so we have been duct-taping that for quite some time now. (more…)

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